About > Fellowship Awardees

Fellowship Awardees


Adrien Auclert

(July 2013 Awardee)

Ph.D. Candidate in Economics

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Adrien is a PhD student in the MIT Department of Economics. He is interested in a broad range of questions in monetary and fiscal policy, financial regulation, and household finance. He particularly likes to study the general equilibrium and welfare effects of policy changes, using theoretical models of behavior fitted to microeconomic data.

Part of his research is focused on the role of household defaults on the macroeconomy and the banking system. In one project he asks whether we should reform the U.S. consumer bankruptcy regime. He also studies the determinants of safe asset provision by intermediaries, and the distributional effects of monetary policy.

A citizen of France, he studied at Ecole Centrale Paris, ENSAE, and the London School of Economics where he obtained a Master's degree. He then worked for the Bank of England before starting his PhD. Adrien also spent a summer at the IMF working on sovereign debt issues.


Juliane Begenau

(January 2013 Awardee)
Job Market Paper

Ph.D. Candidate in Economics

Stanford University

Juliane Begenau is a Ph.D. Candidate in Economics at Stanford University. Before joining the Ph.D. program at the Economics Department of Stanford she completed her undergraduate studies at Humboldt-University of Berlin, Germany.

Her research agenda is centered at the intersection of Macroeconomics and Finance. In particular, she is interested in building dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models in order to assess the quantitative effects of financial regulation on the economy. Her other projects include the measurement of banks’ risk exposure (joint with Martin Schneider and Monika Piazzesi) and the relationship between firm financing and the business cycle (joint with Juliana Salomao).

Juliane was awarded the 2012/13 Kohlhagen Fellowship by the Kohlhagen Fellowship Fund endowed by Steve and Gale Kohlhagen through a grant to the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.


Luigi Bocola

(January 2013 Awardee)
Job Market Paper

Ph.D. Candidate in Economics

University of Pennsylvania

Luigi Bocola is a Ph.D. candidate in Economics at the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests focus on empirical macroeconomics and on the linkages between macroeconomics and the financial sector.

His current research projects are related to the measurement of sovereign default risk and to the study of its consequences on financial intermediation and on aggregate economic activity. A second portion of his research focuses on the development of tools for the empirical evaluation of nonlinear macroeconomic models.

He was awarded the "Albert Ando and Franco Modigliani" scholarship by the Bank of Italy in 2008, the 2012 "Dean Scholar" award by the University of Pennsylvania and the 2012 "Hiram Haney Fellowship" for best third year research paper at the Economics Department of the University of Pennsylvania.    

Currently Luigi is a research assistant at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. Prior to joining the Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania, Luigi earned his Bachelor Degree in International Studies and a graduate degree in Economics at the University of Turin.    


Matteo Crosignani

(January 2014 Awardee)

Ph.D. Candidate in Finance

New York University Stern School of Business

Matteo Crosignani is a Ph.D. Candidate at New York University, Stern School of Business. His research interests include financial intermediation, regulation, and international risk sharing.

His current project focuses on the link between financial and sovereign credit risk in Europe. In particular, he studies the role of domestic banks as buyers of last resort for government debt in turbulent times. The paper “Why Are Banks Not Recapitalized During Crises? A Political Economy Explanation” won the David M. Graifman Memorial Award for the best second year paper in the NYU Stern Finance Department.

Matteo received a Bachelor in Economics from Bocconi University and a Master in Finance and Economics from London School of Economics with a thesis on systemic risk regulation.


Rui Cui

(July 2013 Awardee)

Ph.D. Candidate in Financial Economics

University of Chicago


Rui Cui is a PhD Candidate in Financial Economics at University of Chicago, Booth School of Business and Department of Economics.

His current project "What is cyclical in credit cycles?" explores the general equilibrium causes and consequences of systematic variation in credit quality as we see in the data. His second year paper, "Durable Matters? An Alternative Measure of Consumption Risk" won the best paper award (first prize) at the PhD Forum of 25th Australian Banking and Finance Conference in Sydney, Australia. He has also been an academic consultant to the Committee of Capital Market Regulation on issues related to systemic financial risk.

Prior to the Ph.D program, Rui studied in Hong Kong on a generous scholarship provided by the Hong Kong government. He graduated with a B.B.A  (first class honors) from the Hong Kong Polytechnic University.


Winston Wei Dou

(January 2014 Awardee)

Ph.D. Candidate in Financial Economics

MIT Sloan School of Management

Winston Wei Dou’s research interests include Asset Pricing and its connections to Corporate Finance, Macroeconomics, International Finance, and Econometrics.

In particular, his most recent work focuses on the robust modeling of the interaction between the macro economy and the financial sector, the impact of macro uncertainty on both macro economy and financial markets, quantifying the robustness of asset pricing models, international portfolios and risk premiums, joint theory for the capital structure and dividend policy, and robust GMM with weak identification and misspecification.

He joined the MIT Sloan Ph.D. program in 2010.  He serves as a research assistant under the supervision of Andrew Lo on the project of macroeconomic modeling and systemic risk.  He has published papers and submitted papers in the Annals of Statistics and the Journal of the American Statistical Association.

He received his Ph.D. in Statistics (focusing on asymptotic theory and Econometrics) from Yale University and holds a B.S. in Mathematics and Economics from Peking University, China. 


Maryam Farboodi

(July 2013 Awardee)
Job Market Paper

Ph.D. Candidate in Financial Economics

University of Chicago


Maryam Farboodi is a PhD Candidate in Financial Economics at University of Chicago. Her main research interests are theoretical banking, financial macroeconomics and mechanism design. Her current paper "intermediation and voluntary exposure to systemic risk" studies the question of network formation among financial institutions and its implications for systemic risk, for which she was awarded the Stevanovich fellowship.

She also received Bradley fellowship for her paper
 in corporate finance, "Financing and Control Rights: Entrepreneurial Choice of Funding Source". She has done some work in mechanism design for online auctions, "Optimal Revenue Maximizing Mechanisms in Common-Value Position Auctions", and macroeconomics with financial frictions, "Supply Side Frictions and Lengthy Recoveries".

Before coming to Chicago, Maryam received her B.S. in Computer Engineering from Sharif University of Technology, and her M.S. in Computer Science from University of Maryland. She is originally from Tehran, Iran.

Ji Huang

(January 2013 Awardee)  

Ph.D. Candidate in Economics

Princeton University

Ji Huang is a Ph.D. candidate in the Economics Department at Princeton University.

His current research focuses on shadow banking, including its pro-cyclicality, its interaction with traditional banking, and its implications for financial instability and government intervention.

Prior to attending Princeton University, Ji obtained his bachelor’s degree from Southwestern University of Finance and Economics at Chengdu and his master’s degree from Nankai University at Tianjin.


Andrea Prestipino

(January 2013 Awardee)
Job Market Paper

Ph.D. Candidate in Economics

New York University

Andrea Prestipino is a Ph.D. candidate in the Economics department of New York University.

His research interests include financial frictions, contract theory, and information economics. He completed his Bachelor's and M.Sc. degrees at Bocconi University with a thesis on epistemic game theory.

His current research project aims at developing a framework for studying the effects of systemic risk on the macroeconomy and deriving implications for macroprudential regulation.


Roberto Robatto

(September 2012 Awardee)
Job Market Paper

Ph.D. Candidate in Economics

University of Chicago

Roberto Robatto completed his Bachelor and Masters at Bocconi University and Pompeu Fabra University before joining the PhD program at the Economics Department of the University of Chicago.

His main research interests are monetary economics and the linkages between macroeconomics and the financial system, with emphasis on theoretical analysis and on interactions with economic theory.

He was awarded the 2009 "Crivelli" scholarship by the Unicredit & Universities Foundation and the 2011 Macro Field Lee Prize by the Economics Department of the University of Chicago.

He was the co-president of the Political Economy Club in 2011-2012, managing the organization of student social activities at the Department of Economics of the University of Chicago.

Dejanir Silva

(January 2014 Awardee)

Ph.D. Student of Economics

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Dejanir Silva is a third year Ph.D. student at the Department of Economics at MIT. His research interests span topics in the intersection of macroeconomics, international economics and finance. He is particularly interested in the design of economic policy, from monetary and fiscal policy to macroprudential and financial regulation.

His most recent project studies how the balance sheet position of financial intermediaries can generate contagion in sovereign debt markets and discuss the associated policy response to sovereign default crises. Previously, he has considered how fiscal policy should respond to credit spread shocks for countries in a currency union. In another project, he considers how the fiscal capacity of a country influences the severity of crises.

Prior to joining MIT, Dejanir completed his undergraduate studies and obtained a Master’s degree from the University of São Paulo..


Emil N. Siriwardane

(January 2013 Awardee)

Ph.D. Candidate in Finance

New York University Stern School of Business

Emil N. Siriwardane is a Ph.D. candidate at the NYU Stern School of Business finance department under Professor Robert Engle. His research interests primarily focus on systemic risk in financial markets, financial intermediation, disaster risk in finance, and volatility econometrics.

His recent projects are related to the measurement and asset pricing implications of disaster risk, as well as leverage and volatility cycles.  Another portion of his research agenda investigates whether the organization of credit default swap markets has broader effects on the macroeconomy.

Emil is a research aide for the Office of Financial Research at the U.S. Department of Treasury in Washington, DC.  Earlier in his Ph.D. program, Emil received the David M. Graifman Memorial award, which recognizes the best second year research paper in the Stern Finance department.  Prior to his Ph.D. work at Stern, Emil earned his B.S.E. in Operations Research and Financial Engineering from Princeton University, graduating magna cum laude.  


Daan Struyven

(January 2013 Awardee)

Ph.D. Student in Economics

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Daan Struyven is a third year PhD student at the Department of Economics of MIT. His research interests cover macro-financial institutions and household finance using micro-data.

Currently Daan is pursuing projects on the corporate debt tax bias, central bank collateral policy and mortgage modifications.

Before joining the PhD program at MIT, Daan worked as an economic consultant for the World Bank and on a banking acquisition in the Benelux.

As an undergraduate he studied Business Engineering and Political Sciences at the Université Libre de Bruxelles.


Yu Xu

(July 2013 Awardee)

Ph.D. Candidate in Finance

MIT

Yu Xu is currently a Ph.D. candidate at the MIT Sloan Finance group. Prior
to his doctoral studies he completed undergraduate studies at the
University of Iowa.

His current research project focuses on sovereign credit risk and its
interaction with the domestic banking sector. Another related project (joint
with Hui Chen and Jun Yang) focuses on the relationship between debt
maturity and credit risk at the corporate level.


Amy Y. Zhou

(September 2012 Awardee)
Ph.D. Candidate in Finance

MIT Sloan School of Management

Amy Y. Zhou is a PhD student at the MIT Sloan finance group. Her research interests include systemic risk, currency carry trades, and liquidity.

Her recent projects focus on conducting an empirical comparison among systemic risk measures, and generating early-warning signals for major US/international financial crises.

Amy received her bachelor's degrees in Physics and Electrical Engineering from Caltech, and is also a published author in quantum physics. She has worked at IMF’s Strategy, Policy, and Review Department in Washington DC, and JPMorgan's Proprietary Positioning Business and Fixed Income Strategies in New York. Earlier this year she received MIT's Graduate Teaching Award and Sloan's Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award.